Say hello to the new Falmouth School head

Falmouth Packet: Current deputy head Brett Miners, who will become headteacher next autumn term. Current deputy head Brett Miners, who will become headteacher next autumn term.

The new headteacher of Falmouth School is no stranger to staff and students, having already worked there for seven years.

Born and raised a Cornishman, Brett Miners joined the school as deputy headteacher in 2005, after previously teaching at Helston Community College and then Camborne College as head of sixth form.

With the majority of his professional life spent in the community, Mr Miners said it was therefore particularly special to be achieving his first headship at Falmouth.

He said: “It's an honour and a privilege to be the head of any school, but it's even more special to be the head here, because of that local context.”

Mr Miners said he had “thoroughly enjoyed” his work as deputy head and was delighted to be offered the post of headteacher.

He added: “The town of Falmouth can be proud to have an excellent secondary school and it will be my continual focus to build upon our current work by further embedding the highest standards and expectations for all of our students, whilst providing the opportunities for all of the students to be as successful as they possibly can.”

New chairman of the governors Glyn Williams, who took over the role the beginning of December, said it was Mr Miners' “professionalism” and “vision for the future of the development of the school” that led to his appointment at the end of a nationwide search.

This saw 18 candidates being whittled down to a shortlist of four, who were then put through two and a half days of interviews and a selection process.

The school governors added in a statement that Mr Miners had worked closely with Mrs Critchley in leading and managing the school, and was now ready to “pick up the challenge” and “move the school forward to even greater achievement.”

Mr Miners, who is in his early 40s, lives in the Helston area with his wife, who works in the senior management team of another local school, and they have twin boys who are about to begin secondary school.

He was born in Penzance and his parents are from Porthleven and Penzance.

Comments (4)

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8:42pm Sun 30 Dec 12

juwhite says...

Having read this my first job when the schools go back after Christmas is to apply to every other school in the area Penryn, Truro, Helston etc to get my kids into them. They will be leaving the school as I believe this is the biggest mistake out!! Its funny because everyone I know who went to the school send their children to other schools such as Penryn which to me speaks volumes. They are meant to have an uniform with skirts just above knees yet time and time again I see girls with skirts reaching just below their bums if we are lucky......if you cant enforce this rule then what hope is there?? Other schools that have uniforms seem to stick to the rules yet this school where the uniform was changed just after one of my children started seems unable to enforce it so its a pointless exercise which cost parents a small fortune!! God help the kids
Having read this my first job when the schools go back after Christmas is to apply to every other school in the area Penryn, Truro, Helston etc to get my kids into them. They will be leaving the school as I believe this is the biggest mistake out!! Its funny because everyone I know who went to the school send their children to other schools such as Penryn which to me speaks volumes. They are meant to have an uniform with skirts just above knees yet time and time again I see girls with skirts reaching just below their bums if we are lucky......if you cant enforce this rule then what hope is there?? Other schools that have uniforms seem to stick to the rules yet this school where the uniform was changed just after one of my children started seems unable to enforce it so its a pointless exercise which cost parents a small fortune!! God help the kids juwhite

8:22pm Tue 1 Jan 13

PeteBanfield says...

Sorry, but most schools have their own 'issues'.. Penryn isnt perfect as i found out last month when confronted by a "wall" of kids wondering out of school at hometime. The obligatory skirt/belt look was out in force, kids were smoking in uniform and really didnt appreciate that others like to use the pavements as well. One woman was forced to push her pushchair on the road because the kids were oblivious to anyone else and certainly weren't planning on clearing a path...

I'm not having a go at or defending any specific school, just simply saying that all schools have issues, kids want to grow up too soon but this is not necessarily the fault of a head teacher or their staff, but a more wider issue. Yes teachers are part of the solution but so are parents, peers and the local community.
Sorry, but most schools have their own 'issues'.. Penryn isnt perfect as i found out last month when confronted by a "wall" of kids wondering out of school at hometime. The obligatory skirt/belt look was out in force, kids were smoking in uniform and really didnt appreciate that others like to use the pavements as well. One woman was forced to push her pushchair on the road because the kids were oblivious to anyone else and certainly weren't planning on clearing a path... I'm not having a go at or defending any specific school, just simply saying that all schools have issues, kids want to grow up too soon but this is not necessarily the fault of a head teacher or their staff, but a more wider issue. Yes teachers are part of the solution but so are parents, peers and the local community. PeteBanfield

7:22am Wed 2 Jan 13

juwhite says...

I have to agree with you. Unfortunately in today's society there is no respect. I have always been taught and taught my kids to say please and thank you for example yet many children are not taught these simple words and instead its "Give me or I want" and then when you say to them "Give me....what?" they look at you with blank faces not knowing that you are expecting a please. I do think however where the uniform was changed at great expense to the parents that the rules they brought in should be enforced as it must be awful to be a male teacher for example or a young lad sitting in a classroom with a girl whose skirt is up around her waist practically.
I have to agree with you. Unfortunately in today's society there is no respect. I have always been taught and taught my kids to say please and thank you for example yet many children are not taught these simple words and instead its "Give me or I want" and then when you say to them "Give me....what?" they look at you with blank faces not knowing that you are expecting a please. I do think however where the uniform was changed at great expense to the parents that the rules they brought in should be enforced as it must be awful to be a male teacher for example or a young lad sitting in a classroom with a girl whose skirt is up around her waist practically. juwhite

11:32am Fri 4 Jan 13

molesworth says...

We've moved on from the 1960s and there's more to life than being worried about hem lengths and children getting in your way on pavements. Next you'll be complaining about teenagers' haircuts. My bit of 'bonkers nostalgia' is a belief that a bit of national service would do young people today some good...
We've moved on from the 1960s and there's more to life than being worried about hem lengths and children getting in your way on pavements. Next you'll be complaining about teenagers' haircuts. My bit of 'bonkers nostalgia' is a belief that a bit of national service would do young people today some good... molesworth

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