30 homes for Mylor market garden

First published in News
Last updated
Falmouth Packet: Photograph of the Author by , Ex-Reporter/Photographer

Plans to build 30 houses on a former market garden in Mylor were approved by Cornwall Council this week.

The development of 20 affordable and ten open market homes was given the nod by the council's Central Sub-Area Planning Committee on Monday, who approved the application by ten votes to two.

Opponents had derided the location of the development as unsuitable and dangerous, effectively concreting over an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Supporters made their voices heard at a public meeting last month, saying affordable housing was badly needed in the parish.

Comments (13)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:42pm Wed 13 Feb 13

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

I am glad to see that is a good percentage of affordable dwellings for local needs within the total new build project.
I am glad to see that is a good percentage of affordable dwellings for local needs within the total new build project. Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

12:47pm Thu 14 Feb 13

titanium says...

Agreed. It's important to give the locals a bite of the cherry when it comes to housing. Things are very tough at the moment, and they need all the help they can get.
It'll be interesting to see what "affordable" means though.
Agreed. It's important to give the locals a bite of the cherry when it comes to housing. Things are very tough at the moment, and they need all the help they can get. It'll be interesting to see what "affordable" means though. titanium
  • Score: 0

4:12pm Thu 14 Feb 13

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

Apparently 16 of the 20 will be to rent which in my opinion is even better.
Apparently 16 of the 20 will be to rent which in my opinion is even better. Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Thu 14 Feb 13

titanium says...

That is excellent news for the sixteen lucky families.
That is excellent news for the sixteen lucky families. titanium
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Thu 14 Feb 13

Wave says...

Renting is good as it allows locals somewhere to live if they have nowhere to go, but then it also prevents locals who want to buy a house somewhere to live.
Impossible situation unless there are plenty houses for everyone.
But in critical terms, homes available to rent is better than staying with relatives or being homeless.
I guess the rules are that rental homes are for locals only and not students or visitors to the area.
Because if it was in Falmouth and a home was up for rental it would be filled immediately with high paying students. Which is fine, apart from it competing with locals needing somewhere to live.
So many more houses need to be built. Everywhere.
Renting is good as it allows locals somewhere to live if they have nowhere to go, but then it also prevents locals who want to buy a house somewhere to live. Impossible situation unless there are plenty houses for everyone. But in critical terms, homes available to rent is better than staying with relatives or being homeless. I guess the rules are that rental homes are for locals only and not students or visitors to the area. Because if it was in Falmouth and a home was up for rental it would be filled immediately with high paying students. Which is fine, apart from it competing with locals needing somewhere to live. So many more houses need to be built. Everywhere. Wave
  • Score: 0

7:26am Fri 15 Feb 13

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

The social rented and affordable to buy housing will be for local needs people only. People have to already be on the housing register. I believe it is good to have social rented because some young people cannot afford to raise enough for a mortgage, additionally, in the event of redundancy someone in rented is less likely to lose their home than someone with a mortgage.
The social rented and affordable to buy housing will be for local needs people only. People have to already be on the housing register. I believe it is good to have social rented because some young people cannot afford to raise enough for a mortgage, additionally, in the event of redundancy someone in rented is less likely to lose their home than someone with a mortgage. Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

12:01pm Sat 16 Feb 13

Lanty Slee says...

What we need is some 1960's thinking - blocks of flats are the perfect solution.

Never ever contribute to social decay either, as far as I'm aware...
What we need is some 1960's thinking - blocks of flats are the perfect solution. Never ever contribute to social decay either, as far as I'm aware... Lanty Slee
  • Score: 0

8:52am Sun 17 Feb 13

titanium says...

Lanty Slee makes a good point. We can't continue with housing developments sprawling relentlessly over our countryside.
We need to start building up.
Lanty Slee makes a good point. We can't continue with housing developments sprawling relentlessly over our countryside. We need to start building up. titanium
  • Score: 0

12:06pm Sun 17 Feb 13

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

Some tower blocks built in the 1960s are currently being demolished in some parts of the country. Housing families in flats has proved not ideal due to lack of gardens for children, it additionally has proved to be the cause of some social integration problems. Whilst some smaller developments of flats may be ideal for some people they are not in my view really a long term solution for housing for young families, a good percentage of which makes up the housing register list. There is a vast difference between choosing to live in a flat and being allocated a flat simply because that is all that is available to someone.
Some tower blocks built in the 1960s are currently being demolished in some parts of the country. Housing families in flats has proved not ideal due to lack of gardens for children, it additionally has proved to be the cause of some social integration problems. Whilst some smaller developments of flats may be ideal for some people they are not in my view really a long term solution for housing for young families, a good percentage of which makes up the housing register list. There is a vast difference between choosing to live in a flat and being allocated a flat simply because that is all that is available to someone. Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

9:04am Mon 18 Feb 13

titanium says...

In an ideal world everyone should have their own house. But we are a small island. With immigration out of control, how would you feel if they were going to house 200,000 Bulgarians in Cornwall over the next few years ?.
When you look at the size of for example France, USA and Russia, a heck of a lot of people live in apartments. And their land mass is huge compared to ours.
In an ideal world everyone should have their own house. But we are a small island. With immigration out of control, how would you feel if they were going to house 200,000 Bulgarians in Cornwall over the next few years ?. When you look at the size of for example France, USA and Russia, a heck of a lot of people live in apartments. And their land mass is huge compared to ours. titanium
  • Score: 0

10:03am Mon 18 Feb 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

I understand what you are saying titanium but affordable housing either to buy or social rented will only be available to local needs people who would already have to be on the housing register.
Incomers into the county would have to purchase market value properties and I doubt there would be a very high percentage looking to buy flats, bearing in mind that developers have to build properties that will be financially viable to them and easy to sell in order for them to build properties to be sold as affordable housing. Having said that, obviously if there is a demand for flats then they would sell, but I suspect only places like waterside developments would be desirable. To contemplate large estates of high rise flats as in the 1960's could lead to the same problems experienced elsewhere in the country which have been addressed by the demolition of the estates and the rebuilding of houses.

Houses are much more likely to be accepted by local communities than blocks of flats, bearing in mind too that sufficient parking spaces have to be supplied with blocks of flats. With regards to selling flats as affordable housing, buying a flat does not always work out cheaper than a house because of the ground rent payable yearly in addition to the mortgage for the flat itself and most flats are leasehold and many young families are looking to buy freehold because of the complications involved with leasehold.
If flats were built with a view to renting them out as social housing then either the council or housing associations would have to be prepared to take them on.
I understand what you are saying titanium but affordable housing either to buy or social rented will only be available to local needs people who would already have to be on the housing register. Incomers into the county would have to purchase market value properties and I doubt there would be a very high percentage looking to buy flats, bearing in mind that developers have to build properties that will be financially viable to them and easy to sell in order for them to build properties to be sold as affordable housing. Having said that, obviously if there is a demand for flats then they would sell, but I suspect only places like waterside developments would be desirable. To contemplate large estates of high rise flats as in the 1960's could lead to the same problems experienced elsewhere in the country which have been addressed by the demolition of the estates and the rebuilding of houses. Houses are much more likely to be accepted by local communities than blocks of flats, bearing in mind too that sufficient parking spaces have to be supplied with blocks of flats. With regards to selling flats as affordable housing, buying a flat does not always work out cheaper than a house because of the ground rent payable yearly in addition to the mortgage for the flat itself and most flats are leasehold and many young families are looking to buy freehold because of the complications involved with leasehold. If flats were built with a view to renting them out as social housing then either the council or housing associations would have to be prepared to take them on. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

1:46pm Mon 18 Feb 13

titanium says...

Nice discussion GZM. I would like to make one final point (promise). A few years ago, Penzance accepted "overspill" residents from London. It's so long ago, I forget the year (it's an age thing !) and they occupy a block of flats opposite the harbour. It could happen again !!.
Over to you, I've finished.
Nice discussion GZM. I would like to make one final point (promise). A few years ago, Penzance accepted "overspill" residents from London. It's so long ago, I forget the year (it's an age thing !) and they occupy a block of flats opposite the harbour. It could happen again !!. Over to you, I've finished. titanium
  • Score: 0

2:59pm Mon 18 Feb 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

I agree you have a perfectly valid point there titanium, I must admit I would go along to any public planning meeting if anyone proposed building a high rise tower block of flats for somewhere like an area of outstanding natural Beauty, purely for the entertainment lol just imagine a high rise block of flats for Mylor, Budock, Porthleven or the Lizard or somewhere, being proposed, I could just imagine the objectors. I think the Cornwall Councillors would need to turn up to any meeting with Tazar guns.
I agree you have a perfectly valid point there titanium, I must admit I would go along to any public planning meeting if anyone proposed building a high rise tower block of flats for somewhere like an area of outstanding natural Beauty, purely for the entertainment lol just imagine a high rise block of flats for Mylor, Budock, Porthleven or the Lizard or somewhere, being proposed, I could just imagine the objectors. I think the Cornwall Councillors would need to turn up to any meeting with Tazar guns. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree