Cloned cards warning for Falmouth and Penryn

First published in News
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Falmouth Packet: Photograph of the Author by , Ex-Reporter/Photographer

POLICE have issued a warning to businesses in Falmouth, Penryn and Helston after an alleged fraudster was caught and charged last week.

Sergeant Martin Roberts from Falmouth police said the man was using a cloned card to buy various products across town and, although he has now been stopped, businesses should still “be as suspicious as they can be.”

“If someone comes in and wants to buy two phones, ask them why,” he said, as such questioning will usually elicit the truth from genuine customers.

Comments (11)

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1:09pm Tue 26 Feb 13

Wave says...

That's horrible pressing the public to reveal information about themselves or intentions.
If I get asked anything I will say it's for Batman or something made up.
I never tell businesses real information.
This policeman seems to only have an interest in policing the law not protecting the private existence of individuals.

When buying a mobile sim card from a shop in Falmouth I give fake details.
The same goes for when you buy a TV or recorder, the store asks you for a name address for TV licensing purposes, make that up too.
you are allowed to lie and create fake persona.
I recommend the public only gives their real information or reasons why they are doing something in matters regarding legal situations or when it's a crime to give false details. I think a member of government gave advice like this recently also, though he was put down for doing so.

My tip for today regards loyalty cards.
We have sainsburys and tesco for Falmouth.
With Tesco use a made up name . You will need to receive vouchers to your chosen address.
With sainsburys you don't need to give a real address either as the money can be used straight off the card when you have enough points.
That's horrible pressing the public to reveal information about themselves or intentions. If I get asked anything I will say it's for Batman or something made up. I never tell businesses real information. This policeman seems to only have an interest in policing the law not protecting the private existence of individuals. When buying a mobile sim card from a shop in Falmouth I give fake details. The same goes for when you buy a TV or recorder, the store asks you for a name address for TV licensing purposes, make that up too. you are allowed to lie and create fake persona. I recommend the public only gives their real information or reasons why they are doing something in matters regarding legal situations or when it's a crime to give false details. I think a member of government gave advice like this recently also, though he was put down for doing so. My tip for today regards loyalty cards. We have sainsburys and tesco for Falmouth. With Tesco use a made up name . You will need to receive vouchers to your chosen address. With sainsburys you don't need to give a real address either as the money can be used straight off the card when you have enough points. Wave
  • Score: 0

2:33pm Tue 26 Feb 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

I have always said having to give your address when buying a TV is a futile process as one could just give the address of someone known to have a TV licence already, plus it is ridiculous to stand in somewhere crowded like Argos for example with a new TV and give out ones address, anyone could overhear and decide to observe the property with a view to re-homing ones new TV along with whatever else they saw one purchase.

Any half decent fraudster would have a plausible answer to why they want to buy two phones anyway.


When I bought three phones in the past if I had been questioned I may have been inclined to ask "do you want my trade or not" and go elsewhere.

I do not believe the emphasis should be on making the innocent feel like they are under suspicion.
I have always said having to give your address when buying a TV is a futile process as one could just give the address of someone known to have a TV licence already, plus it is ridiculous to stand in somewhere crowded like Argos for example with a new TV and give out ones address, anyone could overhear and decide to observe the property with a view to re-homing ones new TV along with whatever else they saw one purchase. Any half decent fraudster would have a plausible answer to why they want to buy two phones anyway. When I bought three phones in the past if I had been questioned I may have been inclined to ask "do you want my trade or not" and go elsewhere. I do not believe the emphasis should be on making the innocent feel like they are under suspicion. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

3:12pm Tue 26 Feb 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

They could just answer 'one for each ear'.
They could just answer 'one for each ear'. Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 0

4:43pm Tue 26 Feb 13

Wave says...

Next name I give will be Sergeant Martin Roberts, I won't claim to be a policeman I will just use the name Sergeant Martin Roberts. It might be for the next thing I register for.
Next name I give will be Sergeant Martin Roberts, I won't claim to be a policeman I will just use the name Sergeant Martin Roberts. It might be for the next thing I register for. Wave
  • Score: 0

10:16pm Tue 26 Feb 13

ucsweb says...

What a daft comment "as such questioning will usually elicit the truth from genuine customers".
How will they know if it is the truth?
Or do they expect the fraudster to admit he is stealing from them or make up an unbelievable reason?
What a daft comment "as such questioning will usually elicit the truth from genuine customers". How will they know if it is the truth? Or do they expect the fraudster to admit he is stealing from them or make up an unbelievable reason? ucsweb
  • Score: 0

11:19pm Tue 26 Feb 13

Wave says...

It is not the businesses responsibility to prevent fraud, they can and should sell as much stock to anyone as frequently they can. No questions asked.

It's the banks that are responsible and compensate victims of card fraud.

I would complain to the manager of a business if they began asking me questions.
It is not the businesses responsibility to prevent fraud, they can and should sell as much stock to anyone as frequently they can. No questions asked. It's the banks that are responsible and compensate victims of card fraud. I would complain to the manager of a business if they began asking me questions. Wave
  • Score: 0

12:00am Wed 27 Feb 13

Lanty Slee says...

The good sergeant's got a point though - it is only ever criminals you see buying mobile phones.

And they buy a lot of them.

I saw it on The Wire.
The good sergeant's got a point though - it is only ever criminals you see buying mobile phones. And they buy a lot of them. I saw it on The Wire. Lanty Slee
  • Score: 0

12:27am Wed 27 Feb 13

Wave says...

They should just ask for phones to be banned. And shops.
They should just ask for phones to be banned. And shops. Wave
  • Score: 0

8:40am Wed 27 Feb 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

Why not go the whole hog and ban people?
Why not go the whole hog and ban people? Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 0

11:11am Wed 27 Feb 13

Wave says...

Who would enforce the ban though?
Terminators.
Who would enforce the ban though? Terminators. Wave
  • Score: 0

11:30am Wed 27 Feb 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Why limit it to phones, I bought two cars at the same time once. Everyone will have to leave a lot of extra time for shopping to allow for all this cross questioning.
Why limit it to phones, I bought two cars at the same time once. Everyone will have to leave a lot of extra time for shopping to allow for all this cross questioning. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

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