Falmouth seagull proof sacks prove a great success

Falmouth Packet: Falmouth seagull proof sacks prove a great success Falmouth seagull proof sacks prove a great success

The introduction of new seagull-proof sacks across part of the Smithick ward in Falmouth has already proved a great success, with a dramatic reduction seen in the amount of rubbish left strewn across roads and pavements on collection day.

Councillors Candy Atherton and Diana Merrett joined forces to ensure that every household in their ward will receive one of the sacks, which can hold around four regular bin bags and keep them safe from scavenging seagulls and vermin.

In the first week of the initiative, around 45 per cent of the homes in the ward received their sacks, meaning about 750 houses now have them. They were delivered by representatives of Falmouth Town Council and Cory Environmental.

The first sacks went to the areas around Marlborough Road and Wodehouse Terrace with Clifton Terrace/Crescent set to be the next homes to receive theirs.

Ms Atherton is delighted at the effect the sacks have already had. “After only ten days, there was a 90 per cent improvement in the amount of litter around the area,” she said. “This is absolutely fantastic and more than any of us had dared hope for.

“There were some houses who did not use them, whether that was because they were missed by mistake or they don’t know how to use them, we need to find out. We will go around and see how we can help.

“If you have not had your sack delivered yet, you will get one in the new year. They have run out and are producing new ones as we speak.”

Comments (8)

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6:50am Fri 6 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

They are a much better design than the recycling bags.
They are a much better design than the recycling bags. Gillian Zella Martin 09

11:38am Fri 6 Dec 13

seamus48 says...

I happen to live in Bucks for work at the mo, why don't they introduce wheelie bins in Cornwall FGS? One for general waste, one for all recycling like they have here in Bucks (and many other counties) for example? Cardboard, paper, tins, glass and plastics all go in together. Those silly little coloured recycling bags in Cornwall are laughable. Surely wheelies would be impervious to vermin like gulls ... plastic sacks are sooo out of date. They also have hard plastic food waste recycling bins here, all waste goes into biodegradable bin liners and are placed in the plastic bin when full. The bins have a securable lid that prevents animals opening it. Personally, I think it's about time Cornwall started to handle it's waste in a modern manner.
I happen to live in Bucks for work at the mo, why don't they introduce wheelie bins in Cornwall FGS? One for general waste, one for all recycling like they have here in Bucks (and many other counties) for example? Cardboard, paper, tins, glass and plastics all go in together. Those silly little coloured recycling bags in Cornwall are laughable. Surely wheelies would be impervious to vermin like gulls ... plastic sacks are sooo out of date. They also have hard plastic food waste recycling bins here, all waste goes into biodegradable bin liners and are placed in the plastic bin when full. The bins have a securable lid that prevents animals opening it. Personally, I think it's about time Cornwall started to handle it's waste in a modern manner. seamus48

12:45pm Fri 6 Dec 13

PR Helston says...

Yes most of us know what other counties have and do, Personally I think its about time the government gave Cornwall as much money as they give other counties, then they might actually be able to afford to have the more expensive contractors that deal with waste/recycling etc and afford to supply wheelie bins, although when surveyed, many people didn't want them.
GZM on here has already suggested wheelie bins for recycling etc many times on here and to Cornwall council apparently.
In fact her letter in the packet this week says exactly that.
Yes most of us know what other counties have and do, Personally I think its about time the government gave Cornwall as much money as they give other counties, then they might actually be able to afford to have the more expensive contractors that deal with waste/recycling etc and afford to supply wheelie bins, although when surveyed, many people didn't want them. GZM on here has already suggested wheelie bins for recycling etc many times on here and to Cornwall council apparently. In fact her letter in the packet this week says exactly that. PR Helston

1:02pm Fri 6 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

When making comparisons with other counties waste and recycling arrangements, I believe one needs to bear in mind that many counties have fortnightly residual waste collections and therefore would need a full size wheelie bin, whereas Cornwall has weekly collections. Many people would prefer not to have the storage issue of full size wheelie bins for residual waste additionally they prefer weekly collections. This suits Cornwall Council as they cannot anyway afford to provide full size wheelie bins to everyone.
When making comparisons with other counties waste and recycling arrangements, I believe one needs to bear in mind that many counties have fortnightly residual waste collections and therefore would need a full size wheelie bin, whereas Cornwall has weekly collections. Many people would prefer not to have the storage issue of full size wheelie bins for residual waste additionally they prefer weekly collections. This suits Cornwall Council as they cannot anyway afford to provide full size wheelie bins to everyone. Gillian Zella Martin 09

2:12pm Fri 6 Dec 13

ElevenEleven says...

These are a big step forwards. Well done to the councillors involved.
These are a big step forwards. Well done to the councillors involved. ElevenEleven

5:29pm Fri 6 Dec 13

seamus48 says...

Agreed, funding is certainly an issue but surely an initial outlay on wheelies and new collection lorries would be recouped over time through faster collections, less rubbish on the streets requiring cleaning, less food for vermin like gulls etc. And yes, our general waste bin gets collected fortnightly on alternative weeks with the recycling bin. The food waste gets collected weekly. The bins don't smell because we rinse the bottles and cans etc before they go in the recycling and nothing smelly goes into the general waste. I know some people don't want to go to fortnightly collections, as always some people don't like change whatever it might be. But in a world slowly disappearing under piles of our own rubbish and the black plastic bags used to package it, surely a better way of handling it, and recycling it must be a good thing. When it seems the general consensus is that plastic bags that never rot down have a horrendous impact on the environment (thus we have the campaigns to discourage our reliance on carrier bags), if the best the council can come up with is an even thicker black plastic bag then maybe a rethink is required.
Agreed, funding is certainly an issue but surely an initial outlay on wheelies and new collection lorries would be recouped over time through faster collections, less rubbish on the streets requiring cleaning, less food for vermin like gulls etc. And yes, our general waste bin gets collected fortnightly on alternative weeks with the recycling bin. The food waste gets collected weekly. The bins don't smell because we rinse the bottles and cans etc before they go in the recycling and nothing smelly goes into the general waste. I know some people don't want to go to fortnightly collections, as always some people don't like change whatever it might be. But in a world slowly disappearing under piles of our own rubbish and the black plastic bags used to package it, surely a better way of handling it, and recycling it must be a good thing. When it seems the general consensus is that plastic bags that never rot down have a horrendous impact on the environment (thus we have the campaigns to discourage our reliance on carrier bags), if the best the council can come up with is an even thicker black plastic bag then maybe a rethink is required. seamus48

5:42pm Fri 6 Dec 13

seamus48 says...

Of course another argument could be made that instead of treating the symptoms of the seagull problem, you tackle the problem itself and have a really thorough gull cull periodically... :-)
Of course another argument could be made that instead of treating the symptoms of the seagull problem, you tackle the problem itself and have a really thorough gull cull periodically... :-) seamus48

11:16pm Fri 6 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

seamus48 wrote:
Agreed, funding is certainly an issue but surely an initial outlay on wheelies and new collection lorries would be recouped over time through faster collections, less rubbish on the streets requiring cleaning, less food for vermin like gulls etc. And yes, our general waste bin gets collected fortnightly on alternative weeks with the recycling bin. The food waste gets collected weekly. The bins don't smell because we rinse the bottles and cans etc before they go in the recycling and nothing smelly goes into the general waste. I know some people don't want to go to fortnightly collections, as always some people don't like change whatever it might be. But in a world slowly disappearing under piles of our own rubbish and the black plastic bags used to package it, surely a better way of handling it, and recycling it must be a good thing. When it seems the general consensus is that plastic bags that never rot down have a horrendous impact on the environment (thus we have the campaigns to discourage our reliance on carrier bags), if the best the council can come up with is an even thicker black plastic bag then maybe a rethink is required.
The lorries currently used are fitted with lifting equipment for wheelie bins, the previous contractors lorries were not. I have my own small wheelie bin, it is however the recycling receptacles that are a bone of contention for me, they are useless, they fill up with rain, are an awkward shape, the blue box for glass only, is heavy to lift and the bags blow away in the wind when empty despite having a weighted base. A percentage of the recycling is left in the bags or all over the road. Apart from that the county looks a ridiculous mess with all different brightly coloured bags thrown around, additionally some end up as a hazard in the road.
I know what you are saying makes sense as do probably many others, that is why Cornwall's recycling rate is so low, other counties that have an incinerator still have higher recycling rates than Cornwall.
Try telling Cornwall Council all this, I've tried but Cornwall Council know best :)
[quote][p][bold]seamus48[/bold] wrote: Agreed, funding is certainly an issue but surely an initial outlay on wheelies and new collection lorries would be recouped over time through faster collections, less rubbish on the streets requiring cleaning, less food for vermin like gulls etc. And yes, our general waste bin gets collected fortnightly on alternative weeks with the recycling bin. The food waste gets collected weekly. The bins don't smell because we rinse the bottles and cans etc before they go in the recycling and nothing smelly goes into the general waste. I know some people don't want to go to fortnightly collections, as always some people don't like change whatever it might be. But in a world slowly disappearing under piles of our own rubbish and the black plastic bags used to package it, surely a better way of handling it, and recycling it must be a good thing. When it seems the general consensus is that plastic bags that never rot down have a horrendous impact on the environment (thus we have the campaigns to discourage our reliance on carrier bags), if the best the council can come up with is an even thicker black plastic bag then maybe a rethink is required.[/p][/quote]The lorries currently used are fitted with lifting equipment for wheelie bins, the previous contractors lorries were not. I have my own small wheelie bin, it is however the recycling receptacles that are a bone of contention for me, they are useless, they fill up with rain, are an awkward shape, the blue box for glass only, is heavy to lift and the bags blow away in the wind when empty despite having a weighted base. A percentage of the recycling is left in the bags or all over the road. Apart from that the county looks a ridiculous mess with all different brightly coloured bags thrown around, additionally some end up as a hazard in the road. I know what you are saying makes sense as do probably many others, that is why Cornwall's recycling rate is so low, other counties that have an incinerator still have higher recycling rates than Cornwall. Try telling Cornwall Council all this, I've tried but Cornwall Council know best :) Gillian Zella Martin 09

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