Cut price parking in Falmouth on offer

Falmouth Packet: Cut price parking in Falmouth on offer Cut price parking in Falmouth on offer

MOTORISTS in Falmouth and Penryn can apply for cut-price season tickets for some of the towns' council car parks, but only for a limited three month period.

In Falmouth it means a saving of £548 can be made for season tickets for the Dell and Quarry car parks, which will cost £350 for a year instead of £898; and at Gyllyngvase car park the cost is down from £320 to £230. In Penryn's Commercial Road facility, the charge is down to £250 - a saving of £170.

These cut price deals will only be available, though, between January 2 and March 31. As well as reducing the cost to motorists, the trial will assess if reducing the price of season tickets will encourage more drivers to buy them.

Those who have already bought a season ticket will be able to apply for a pro rata refund from Cornwall Council. A similar trial ran in Launceston last year and proved a success.

The season ticket trial is one of three pilot schemes being introduced in Cornwall Council car parks over the next six months, following the decision of the council to set aside £1.2m to underwrite any losses arising from the experiments.

These tariffs could become permanent if the trial schemes prove financially viable.

Another pilot parking scheme will give all motorists the option of using their mobile phone to access 30 minutes free parking in all council car parks between March 1 and April 20.

Councillor Bert Biscoe, portfolio holder for transport and waste, said: “Cornish towns rely on commerce and commuters to create the prosperity which they generate.

“In difficult times it is important the council's car parks should support competitiveness and generate good business both for the towns and for themselves.”

For more information about the trial visit www.cornwall.gov.co.uk/parkingoffers.

Comments (16)

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7:26am Fri 27 Dec 13

iandharvey says...

The correct website for information is:

www.cornwall.gov.uk/
parkingoffers

.
The correct website for information is: www.cornwall.gov.uk/ parkingoffers . iandharvey
  • Score: -10

7:29am Fri 27 Dec 13

iandharvey says...

Why did my initial comment format incorrectly?

www.cornwall.gov.uk/
parkingoffers
Why did my initial comment format incorrectly? www.cornwall.gov.uk/ parkingoffers iandharvey
  • Score: -10

9:59am Fri 27 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers.

On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing.

But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain.

What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse.

All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.
It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers. On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing. But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain. What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse. All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK. Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 6

11:57am Fri 27 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe wrote:
It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers.

On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing.

But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain.

What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse.

All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.
I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers.
I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping)
I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle.
I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet)
Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe[/bold] wrote: It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers. On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing. But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain. What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse. All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.[/p][/quote]I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers. I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping) I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle. I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet) Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 4

12:38pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

Gillian Zella Martin 09 wrote:
Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe wrote:
It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers.

On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing.

But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain.

What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse.

All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.
I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers.
I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping)
I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle.
I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet)
Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed.
Gill, thanks for your, as always, considered reply. It's indeed a similar unreasonable experience that you report. Your words "I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason", sums up the situation well. We all know small shopkeepers sometimes have it tough, but if they are going to indiscriminately suspect people and are unwilling or unable to apply common sense, they need to at least learn to do so discreetly.
I understand why you won't go back to that shop. As a result of what happened to us, there is now a shop which my wife loves and passes a few times a week that she won't enter again. A lose-lose situation if ever there was one.
[quote][p][bold]Gillian Zella Martin 09[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe[/bold] wrote: It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers. On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing. But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain. What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse. All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.[/p][/quote]I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers. I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping) I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle. I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet) Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed.[/p][/quote]Gill, thanks for your, as always, considered reply. It's indeed a similar unreasonable experience that you report. Your words "I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason", sums up the situation well. We all know small shopkeepers sometimes have it tough, but if they are going to indiscriminately suspect people and are unwilling or unable to apply common sense, they need to at least learn to do so discreetly. I understand why you won't go back to that shop. As a result of what happened to us, there is now a shop which my wife loves and passes a few times a week that she won't enter again. A lose-lose situation if ever there was one. Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 6

2:35pm Fri 27 Dec 13

ElevenEleven says...

It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past.

As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners.

Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking.
It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past. As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners. Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking. ElevenEleven
  • Score: 2

4:49pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

ElevenEleven wrote:
It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past.

As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners.

Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking.
ElevenEleven, I believe to apply "common sense" in any shop, in respect of 'revenue' protection, would not in my view be "discrimination" "common sense" to me, would be not making a sudden move to block the exit of 'any' customer for no apparent reason, not following any customer around closely or hovering by their side, and only apprehending them after they had left the shop, if they were actually seen taking something and not subsequently paying. I reiterate, I realise some shops have a theft problem but losing genuine paying customers is not the answer to the problem. Perhaps it might be productive to apply discreet and tactful observational skills. I personally find trust pays far more dividends than mistrust.

How many customers would the large supermarkets lose I wonder, if every time a self service till said "unexpected item in the bagging area" it instead said, "the supermarket thinks you're trying to steal something, please wait for assistance"

On topic, I agree daily car-park charges would be better reduced, alongside the reduction in season tickets.
[quote][p][bold]ElevenEleven[/bold] wrote: It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past. As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners. Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking.[/p][/quote]ElevenEleven, I believe to apply "common sense" in any shop, in respect of 'revenue' protection, would not in my view be "discrimination" "common sense" to me, would be not making a sudden move to block the exit of 'any' customer for no apparent reason, not following any customer around closely or hovering by their side, and only apprehending them after they had left the shop, if they were actually seen taking something and not subsequently paying. I reiterate, I realise some shops have a theft problem but losing genuine paying customers is not the answer to the problem. Perhaps it might be productive to apply discreet and tactful observational skills. I personally find trust pays far more dividends than mistrust. How many customers would the large supermarkets lose I wonder, if every time a self service till said "unexpected item in the bagging area" it instead said, "the supermarket thinks you're trying to steal something, please wait for assistance" On topic, I agree daily car-park charges would be better reduced, alongside the reduction in season tickets. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 4

8:02am Sun 29 Dec 13

molesworth says...

Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion.
You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.
Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion. You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters. molesworth
  • Score: 8

8:21am Sun 29 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

molesworth wrote:
Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion.
You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.
No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me!
[quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion. You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.[/p][/quote]No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me! Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 5

3:20pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

molesworth wrote:
Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion.
You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.
Only one, Moley: an exact replica of my own face, so I don't think she would have noticed that.
[quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion. You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.[/p][/quote]Only one, Moley: an exact replica of my own face, so I don't think she would have noticed that. Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 1

3:22pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

Gillian Zella Martin 09 wrote:
molesworth wrote:
Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion.
You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.
No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me!
The same thought had crossed my own mind Gill. But the shopkeeper herself looked a bit odd, so that can't be it...
[quote][p][bold]Gillian Zella Martin 09[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion. You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.[/p][/quote]No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me![/p][/quote]The same thought had crossed my own mind Gill. But the shopkeeper herself looked a bit odd, so that can't be it... Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 1

3:24pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

ElevenEleven wrote:
It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past.

As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners.

Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking.
Well discretion at least then! Sorry for straying "off-topic" but the actual topic makes ditchwater seem enticing...
[quote][p][bold]ElevenEleven[/bold] wrote: It is unfortunate you have had those experiences, and it sounds like they could have been handled a lot better; but the truth is that there is quite a lot of retail crime in the area and I suspect these store owners have been stung in the past. As for using "common sense", that would also be known as discrimination unless you were indeed a long standing customers known to the store owners. Back on topic, this is a good move from Cornwall Council but it must be followed by a decrease in the price of a normal ticket, not just season tickets. The new Cornwall Council at last seem to be recognising the damage that previous councils have done to our towns though with overpriced parking.[/p][/quote]Well discretion at least then! Sorry for straying "off-topic" but the actual topic makes ditchwater seem enticing... Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 1

9:14pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe wrote:
Gillian Zella Martin 09 wrote:
molesworth wrote:
Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion.
You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.
No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me!
The same thought had crossed my own mind Gill. But the shopkeeper herself looked a bit odd, so that can't be it...
Lol, I've come to the conclusion I must just look naturally suspicious! I remember once being followed around WHS in Lewisham South London, until I turned round and said to the gentleman "if you don't stop following me around you will lose my custom and while you are following me, if you haven't noticed, the alarms are busy going off at the doorway!" the gentleman then asked me how I realised he was a plain clothed security guard, to which I replied "I am successfully more observant than you are" he never bothered me again.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gillian Zella Martin 09[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Gill and Bazza: Have you any facial tattoos? They can often cause unnecessary suspicion. You wouldn't be treated so shoddily in Saville Row. I'm afraid the class of shop worker in Falmouth might not be up to scratch. I'm not talking about social class I'm talking about dealing with customers in a 'classy' way. Like they do in proper gentleman's outfitters.[/p][/quote]No I have no tattoos at all, or body piercings etc, apart from one small earring in each ear. I always thought I looked like a normal person but now you have made me wonder, perhaps there is something abnormally looking about me![/p][/quote]The same thought had crossed my own mind Gill. But the shopkeeper herself looked a bit odd, so that can't be it...[/p][/quote]Lol, I've come to the conclusion I must just look naturally suspicious! I remember once being followed around WHS in Lewisham South London, until I turned round and said to the gentleman "if you don't stop following me around you will lose my custom and while you are following me, if you haven't noticed, the alarms are busy going off at the doorway!" the gentleman then asked me how I realised he was a plain clothed security guard, to which I replied "I am successfully more observant than you are" he never bothered me again. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 2

12:25pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Rainbow over Helston says...

Gillian Zella Martin 09 wrote:
Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe wrote:
It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers.

On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing.

But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain.

What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse.

All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.
I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers.
I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping)
I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle.
I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet)
Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed.
Northern or Southern Ireland Gill? I reckon some shop keepers do judge people by their accents.
[quote][p][bold]Gillian Zella Martin 09[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe[/bold] wrote: It's all well and good trying to lure more shoppers into Falmouth but a recent incident has underlined to me how some of the shopkeepers badly need to wise up in terms of attitude to customers. On the Saturday before Christmas, my wife was browsing in a small jewellery and knick-knacks store that shall remain nameless, while I hung about bored. The shopkeeper seemed attentive as she helped my wife remove a necklace she had tried on but had difficulty removing. But subsequently, as I waited outside, she went and stood within inches of my wife, making a show of closing an inner door and standing "on guard" at it, all the time watching her like a hawk. We both became aware of her unreasonable attention at roughly the same time. My wife, offended, put down the item/s she had been about to buy and said "I can't believe you think I'm going to steal it!" I chipped in by pointing out to her that her actions were very unsubtle if not downright rude and that they would lose her custom. On the defensive, she just said curtly "Can you leave please?" So if it was a misunderstanding of some sort, she made no attempt to explain. What happened to the customer always being right? What happened to trust? What happened to the spirit of Christmas? Do they get a lot of middle-aged, middle-class shoplifting couples in there? My wife has a foreign accent, but if that was anything to do with the shopkeeper's actions, that makes it even worse. All in all, the experience left a horrible taste in the mouth in the run-up to Christmas. Neither of us have a criminal record of any sort and have never shoplifted. It was the first time I recall ever being treated this way by any shopkeeper, in Falmouth or anywhere in the UK.[/p][/quote]I understand exactly how you and your wife felt, and agree entirely that the right attitude plays a big part towards encouraging shoppers. I tried a coat on in a Falmouth shop fairly recently, one of the shop staff immediately and so blatantly came up and stood guard by the door. This annoyed me and I think the look on my face said it all, the member of staff did then return to the middle of the shop by the till, I did actually go on to purchase a coat but normally if that behaviour is evident I leave the shop, as I refuse to be under suspicion for no reason. I have no criminal record and have never stolen anything in my life, I now would not choose to return to that particular shop in Falmouth. This is one advantage the chain stores such as Marks and Spencer's will always have, I have never been followed around or been made to feel like a criminal in any large chain store. (Admittedly they can probably afford CCTV, but at least one feels comfortable shopping) I have never experienced a problem in Helston other than in one charity shop where I felt I was being watched too closely, so I left on principle. I realise shops probably do have a theft problem but I don't think making innocent potential customers feel uncomfortable is the right way to combat this. (I wrote a letter on this subject a long time ago that was printed in the Packet) Incidentally I am told I have a London accent but I was not born nor have lived in London. I am surprised if I have any one specific accent as I have lived in Ireland, Kent, and Cornwall, additionally spent a lot of time in France and Belgium years ago. Therefore one should in my view definitely not judge or categorise anyone by their accent or indeed their looks or how they are dressed.[/p][/quote]Northern or Southern Ireland Gill? I reckon some shop keepers do judge people by their accents. Rainbow over Helston
  • Score: 1

1:31pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Gillian Zella Martin 09 says...

Southern Ireland, Dublin 5.

There is a saying 'you shouldn't judge a book by its cover' perhaps some shopkeepers would do well to remember that.
Southern Ireland, Dublin 5. There is a saying 'you shouldn't judge a book by its cover' perhaps some shopkeepers would do well to remember that. Gillian Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

1:41pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe says...

Gillian Zella Martin 09 wrote:
Southern Ireland, Dublin 5.

There is a saying 'you shouldn't judge a book by its cover' perhaps some shopkeepers would do well to remember that.
Especially bookshop owners, maybe...
[quote][p][bold]Gillian Zella Martin 09[/bold] wrote: Southern Ireland, Dublin 5. There is a saying 'you shouldn't judge a book by its cover' perhaps some shopkeepers would do well to remember that.[/p][/quote]Especially bookshop owners, maybe... Lord Barrington Forbes-Smythe
  • Score: 1

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