Council clamp-down on multi occupancy homes in Falmouth as 'Article 4' finally agreed

Council clamp-down on multi occupancy homes in Falmouth as 'Article 4' finally agreed

Council clamp-down on multi occupancy homes in Falmouth as 'Article 4' finally agreed

First published in News
Last updated

NEWS that Falmouth will at last be able to control the spread of multi-occupancy homes across the town after winning a three year battle to implement an Article Four direction, led to tears in the council chamber this week.

Councillor Diana Merrett has long campaigned for the legislation, which will mean anyone wishing to convert a property into a house of multiple occupation (HMO) will require planning permission, and broke down when told it had been granted.

Since 2010, the town council has been trying to convince Cornwall Council of the need for an Article Four direction, claiming areas of the town, Marlborough Road and Kimberley Park Road in particular, have effectively become “student ghettos” with local families being pushed out.

When Councillor Candy Atherton won seats on both the town and county council last May, she took on the fight and this week told her colleagues in Falmouth that Councillor Edwina Hannaford, portfolio holder for environment, heritage and planning, had agreed to their request for Article Four.

She said that as Ms Hannaford had made the decision, it did not need to go before the cabinet, but would be put to the homes and communities portfolio advisory committee for a decision on what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation. It will, however, take a year to implement it.

Ms Atherton said: “Not all the Cornwall Council officers were on board with this. It is not a stick with which to beat the university – it is an opportunity to work together. We have a long way to go, but we are on the road and the decision has been made. We must now make it work for the town and for the universities.”

Breaking down in tears at Monday’s meeting, Councillor Merrett, praised Ms Atherton’s efforts, saying: “I am so tearful. I cannot believe this. We have fought for so long for and for you to come along and get it for us is great.”

Speaking the next day, she added: “Everybody is over the moon. People are sick and tired of walking down their street and not knowing anybody any more. We really need this to bring our local communities back.”

Councillors were told that to enable the Article Four direction to work effectively, they would need to produce a neighbourhood plan to back it up. “If we want the Article Four to be meaningful and to work for the whole community – for the universities and the town – we need to have the two working in tandem,” said Ms Atherton.

Comments (34)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:25pm Wed 5 Mar 14

GrahamHarris says...

Congratulations to the people who have worked tirelessly to get this.

It has taken an awful long time for the 'powers that be' to see sense, but good to see that persistance had paid off.

This is the right thing for the town.
Congratulations to the people who have worked tirelessly to get this. It has taken an awful long time for the 'powers that be' to see sense, but good to see that persistance had paid off. This is the right thing for the town. GrahamHarris
  • Score: -4

4:25pm Wed 5 Mar 14

falmouthresident says...

Why not work to include students as PART OF the community instead of demonising them at every turn? 'Student Ghettos' is a ridiculous phrase.
Why not work to include students as PART OF the community instead of demonising them at every turn? 'Student Ghettos' is a ridiculous phrase. falmouthresident
  • Score: 16

4:31pm Wed 5 Mar 14

GrahamHarris says...

It's just an easier way of putting it than saying ''an overwhelming number of student lets on the same road''.
It's just an easier way of putting it than saying ''an overwhelming number of student lets on the same road''. GrahamHarris
  • Score: -5

5:19pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Gillian R.Z. Martin says...

Putting the Article Four aside, I was in KFC last week on The Moor and there was a group of students in there, I found them all extremely polite and openly friendly, as always. I personally do not see the relevance of "people walking down their street and not knowing anyone anymore," I have always found the best way to get to know ones neighbours if one so wishes, is to speak to them, whether they be students, families, elderly people or whoever.
Putting the Article Four aside, I was in KFC last week on The Moor and there was a group of students in there, I found them all extremely polite and openly friendly, as always. I personally do not see the relevance of "people walking down their street and not knowing anyone anymore," I have always found the best way to get to know ones neighbours if one so wishes, is to speak to them, whether they be students, families, elderly people or whoever. Gillian R.Z. Martin
  • Score: 17

8:13pm Wed 5 Mar 14

seacom says...

Well done Councillor Merrett for your determination and Councillor Atherton for for her leverage in this matter.Just a shame all councillors could not unite to support general public opinion .Not many student lets in Mullion i imagine Gill, hope you enjoyed your chicken queue was a bit long though.
Well done Councillor Merrett for your determination and Councillor Atherton for for her leverage in this matter.Just a shame all councillors could not unite to support general public opinion .Not many student lets in Mullion i imagine Gill, hope you enjoyed your chicken queue was a bit long though. seacom
  • Score: -12

8:45pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Gillian R.Z. Martin says...

seacom wrote:
Well done Councillor Merrett for your determination and Councillor Atherton for for her leverage in this matter.Just a shame all councillors could not unite to support general public opinion .Not many student lets in Mullion i imagine Gill, hope you enjoyed your chicken queue was a bit long though.
There may not be many student lets in Mullion, there are however plenty of second homes, some of which are empty for most of the year, it could be said "people are walking down their street and not knowing anybody anymore" as I previously said, that is irrelevant, one can speak to any neighbour or local resident to get to know people.

No the queue was not very long in KFC, it would not have affected me anyway as the students very kindly offered for me to be served first, I did however decline.
[quote][p][bold]seacom[/bold] wrote: Well done Councillor Merrett for your determination and Councillor Atherton for for her leverage in this matter.Just a shame all councillors could not unite to support general public opinion .Not many student lets in Mullion i imagine Gill, hope you enjoyed your chicken queue was a bit long though.[/p][/quote]There may not be many student lets in Mullion, there are however plenty of second homes, some of which are empty for most of the year, it could be said "people are walking down their street and not knowing anybody anymore" as I previously said, that is irrelevant, one can speak to any neighbour or local resident to get to know people. No the queue was not very long in KFC, it would not have affected me anyway as the students very kindly offered for me to be served first, I did however decline. Gillian R.Z. Martin
  • Score: 12

2:07pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Pendennisracer says...

The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant.

Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth.

It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged.

I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area.

Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things.

No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return.

Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.
The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant. Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth. It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged. I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area. Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things. No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return. Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system. Pendennisracer
  • Score: -5

2:13pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Helston fly on the wall says...

I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university.
How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.
I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university. How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder. Helston fly on the wall
  • Score: 23

2:24pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Lord Alfreston says...

Helston fly on the wall wrote:
I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university.
How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.
The problem is that families living there were driven out as more and more students moved in. Their houses were then bought by student landlords making the problem worse for those families who left, who then also moved out. And so it went on.
What this Article 4 does is allow the council to control the number of multi-occupancy homes in specific areas, although it's probably too late for areas like Marlborough Road. I'm not anti-student either, without them the town would be much less vibrant and even more of a cultural desert than it is now.
[quote][p][bold]Helston fly on the wall[/bold] wrote: I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university. How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.[/p][/quote]The problem is that families living there were driven out as more and more students moved in. Their houses were then bought by student landlords making the problem worse for those families who left, who then also moved out. And so it went on. What this Article 4 does is allow the council to control the number of multi-occupancy homes in specific areas, although it's probably too late for areas like Marlborough Road. I'm not anti-student either, without them the town would be much less vibrant and even more of a cultural desert than it is now. Lord Alfreston
  • Score: 16

3:01pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Pendennisracer says...

Helston fly on the wall wrote:
I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university.
How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.
As a student let, these properties will generate £1000+ per month with very little upkeep, regardless of where it is. A holiday let won't bring in that sort of money in a residential area property, so no, unlikely to be holiday lets if not student homes.

Looking at this income versus someone paying £500-£750 mortgage it's easy to see why locals are being driven out, even low value ex-council homes are becoming student lets.

Come to Falmouth, park your car in Killigrew Street & walk along the terraces either side and you will soon see what we are up against.
[quote][p][bold]Helston fly on the wall[/bold] wrote: I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university. How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.[/p][/quote]As a student let, these properties will generate £1000+ per month with very little upkeep, regardless of where it is. A holiday let won't bring in that sort of money in a residential area property, so no, unlikely to be holiday lets if not student homes. Looking at this income versus someone paying £500-£750 mortgage it's easy to see why locals are being driven out, even low value ex-council homes are becoming student lets. Come to Falmouth, park your car in Killigrew Street & walk along the terraces either side and you will soon see what we are up against. Pendennisracer
  • Score: -1

3:51pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Helston fly on the wall says...

Pendennisracer wrote:
Helston fly on the wall wrote:
I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university.
How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.
As a student let, these properties will generate £1000+ per month with very little upkeep, regardless of where it is. A holiday let won't bring in that sort of money in a residential area property, so no, unlikely to be holiday lets if not student homes.

Looking at this income versus someone paying £500-£750 mortgage it's easy to see why locals are being driven out, even low value ex-council homes are becoming student lets.

Come to Falmouth, park your car in Killigrew Street & walk along the terraces either side and you will soon see what we are up against.
You say even ex council houses which are cheaper are becoming student lets, that might be but the thing is nearly all properties are advertised on the market for quite some time before being sold, you only have to look in the estate agents windows, so if local people could afford them they would buy them before the landlords do. I know a holiday let wouldn't gain as much income as a student let, all I was saying was if you had no students I still think locals wouldn't afford the properties and they would end up as second homes the same as they have in Helston and other towns. It is not as if there is no problem in any other town, thousands of local people can't afford to live in the town they were born in and thousands of youngsters can't afford to buy not even the houses they call affordable.
[quote][p][bold]Pendennisracer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helston fly on the wall[/bold] wrote: I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university. How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.[/p][/quote]As a student let, these properties will generate £1000+ per month with very little upkeep, regardless of where it is. A holiday let won't bring in that sort of money in a residential area property, so no, unlikely to be holiday lets if not student homes. Looking at this income versus someone paying £500-£750 mortgage it's easy to see why locals are being driven out, even low value ex-council homes are becoming student lets. Come to Falmouth, park your car in Killigrew Street & walk along the terraces either side and you will soon see what we are up against.[/p][/quote]You say even ex council houses which are cheaper are becoming student lets, that might be but the thing is nearly all properties are advertised on the market for quite some time before being sold, you only have to look in the estate agents windows, so if local people could afford them they would buy them before the landlords do. I know a holiday let wouldn't gain as much income as a student let, all I was saying was if you had no students I still think locals wouldn't afford the properties and they would end up as second homes the same as they have in Helston and other towns. It is not as if there is no problem in any other town, thousands of local people can't afford to live in the town they were born in and thousands of youngsters can't afford to buy not even the houses they call affordable. Helston fly on the wall
  • Score: 8

4:09pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Helston fly on the wall says...

Lord Alfreston wrote:
Helston fly on the wall wrote:
I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university.
How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.
The problem is that families living there were driven out as more and more students moved in. Their houses were then bought by student landlords making the problem worse for those families who left, who then also moved out. And so it went on.
What this Article 4 does is allow the council to control the number of multi-occupancy homes in specific areas, although it's probably too late for areas like Marlborough Road. I'm not anti-student either, without them the town would be much less vibrant and even more of a cultural desert than it is now.
I see what you mean.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Alfreston[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helston fly on the wall[/bold] wrote: I don't understand this "local families being pushed out" when a property becomes available on the market anyone can buy it so I assume local families couldn't afford them and that's why landlords bought them. House prices are pushing local families out, not students, and house prices have rocketed all over Cornwall because of its popularity. I bet if you had no students in Falmouth, locals still wouldn't be able to afford those size properties and people would buy them as second homes or wealthy people would buy them to live in. I can't see it solving the lack of housing for locals on low incomes anymore than any other Cornish town that doesn't have a university. How long will it be I wonder before Ms Atherton stands for MP. Is this the ground work I wonder.[/p][/quote]The problem is that families living there were driven out as more and more students moved in. Their houses were then bought by student landlords making the problem worse for those families who left, who then also moved out. And so it went on. What this Article 4 does is allow the council to control the number of multi-occupancy homes in specific areas, although it's probably too late for areas like Marlborough Road. I'm not anti-student either, without them the town would be much less vibrant and even more of a cultural desert than it is now.[/p][/quote]I see what you mean. Helston fly on the wall
  • Score: 2

6:55pm Thu 6 Mar 14

victoriameldrew says...

firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!!
firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!! victoriameldrew
  • Score: 8

12:34am Fri 7 Mar 14

ereinoesyou says...

victoriameldrew wrote:
firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!!
As a local "young" (29) person who cannot afford to buy a house on my wage, can only get a mortgage of around 50k which wouldn't even buy a "affordable" house, I also find it impossible to rent a property in falmouth anymore as after rent, water, council tax etc. I wouldn't be left with enough money to feed myself. I welcome this move but can't help thinking it's too late. Strange to think 11 years ago I was living in rented accommodation and now, like a growing number of other people my age (and older) I'm having to live with my parents again.
[quote][p][bold]victoriameldrew[/bold] wrote: firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!![/p][/quote]As a local "young" (29) person who cannot afford to buy a house on my wage, can only get a mortgage of around 50k which wouldn't even buy a "affordable" house, I also find it impossible to rent a property in falmouth anymore as after rent, water, council tax etc. I wouldn't be left with enough money to feed myself. I welcome this move but can't help thinking it's too late. Strange to think 11 years ago I was living in rented accommodation and now, like a growing number of other people my age (and older) I'm having to live with my parents again. ereinoesyou
  • Score: 12

3:37pm Fri 7 Mar 14

victoriameldrew says...

ereinoesyou wrote:
victoriameldrew wrote:
firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!!
As a local "young" (29) person who cannot afford to buy a house on my wage, can only get a mortgage of around 50k which wouldn't even buy a "affordable" house, I also find it impossible to rent a property in falmouth anymore as after rent, water, council tax etc. I wouldn't be left with enough money to feed myself. I welcome this move but can't help thinking it's too late. Strange to think 11 years ago I was living in rented accommodation and now, like a growing number of other people my age (and older) I'm having to live with my parents again.
not quite sure why you picked up my message to respond to but, I do sympathise with you youngsters trying to get on the housing ladder. Our first house was £20k and that was early 80's - a modest, 2 bedroomed Boslowick house - yes it was a struggle to keep up with the mortgage repayments, gas, electric, poll tax (a really unfair tax even compared to the council tax) food etc - but - we did cope. The wages in the west country are ridiculously low, we have higher council tax than some parts of London and our water bills are one of the highest in the country. Until someone actually addresses those issues, youngsters, like you, are always going to be in that position. I do feel for you.
[quote][p][bold]ereinoesyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]victoriameldrew[/bold] wrote: firstly I have to say I was extremely worried when the 3 bedroomed semi detached house next door to me in the Boslowick area of Falmouth, was sold to a local man who bought it for student let. My fears of the noise and anti-social behaviour have, so far, been unfounded. One of the lads is absolutely lovely - polite and chatty and is a credit to his family. I am though disgusted that the owner of this 3 bedroomed (4 at a push) could actually squeeze 5 bedrooms - they do not have an area large enough to eat, they all eat in their bedrooms. This is pure greed of the landlord with total disregard to the inhabitants and the neighbours. I just hope that the new students are as nice - can we really strike lucky twice?!!!![/p][/quote]As a local "young" (29) person who cannot afford to buy a house on my wage, can only get a mortgage of around 50k which wouldn't even buy a "affordable" house, I also find it impossible to rent a property in falmouth anymore as after rent, water, council tax etc. I wouldn't be left with enough money to feed myself. I welcome this move but can't help thinking it's too late. Strange to think 11 years ago I was living in rented accommodation and now, like a growing number of other people my age (and older) I'm having to live with my parents again.[/p][/quote]not quite sure why you picked up my message to respond to but, I do sympathise with you youngsters trying to get on the housing ladder. Our first house was £20k and that was early 80's - a modest, 2 bedroomed Boslowick house - yes it was a struggle to keep up with the mortgage repayments, gas, electric, poll tax (a really unfair tax even compared to the council tax) food etc - but - we did cope. The wages in the west country are ridiculously low, we have higher council tax than some parts of London and our water bills are one of the highest in the country. Until someone actually addresses those issues, youngsters, like you, are always going to be in that position. I do feel for you. victoriameldrew
  • Score: 8

11:00pm Fri 7 Mar 14

ereinoesyou says...

Victoria I have no idea why it quoted you... how strange. I blame the glitches in the matrix...
Victoria I have no idea why it quoted you... how strange. I blame the glitches in the matrix... ereinoesyou
  • Score: -3

12:01am Sun 9 Mar 14

molesworth says...

Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants.
Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants. molesworth
  • Score: 10

12:44pm Mon 10 Mar 14

esswords says...

"what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be?
"what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be? esswords
  • Score: 0

4:57pm Mon 10 Mar 14

hopkins93 says...

Pendennisracer wrote:
The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant.

Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth.

It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged.

I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area.

Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things.

No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return.

Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.
Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are.

I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me.

However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true.

Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time.

Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse.

I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting.

I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such.
[quote][p][bold]Pendennisracer[/bold] wrote: The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant. Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth. It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged. I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area. Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things. No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return. Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.[/p][/quote]Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are. I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me. However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true. Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time. Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse. I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting. I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such. hopkins93
  • Score: 20

5:37pm Mon 10 Mar 14

juwhite says...

Unfortunately it is the bad ones we always hear about and I have to say Hopkins93 you are in a minority. I live in a road with some 4 houses rented to students with 5 or 6 students in each the majority who have cars hence about 20 cars whereas if it were a family we would probably have 8 cars so there is a big difference. We suffer noise from parties, rubbish and general untidiness from them and to be honest they are rude when approached about this. It got so bad at one point that we had a rat problem and raw sewerage in the garden of one of the properties which ran out onto the street. We approached the students and asked them to inform their landlord but nothing was done. It took having environmental health from the council out to get something done. So you have to see it from both points - yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them! Sadly because of situations like this then people do generalise which I admit is wrong.
Unfortunately it is the bad ones we always hear about and I have to say Hopkins93 you are in a minority. I live in a road with some 4 houses rented to students with 5 or 6 students in each the majority who have cars hence about 20 cars whereas if it were a family we would probably have 8 cars so there is a big difference. We suffer noise from parties, rubbish and general untidiness from them and to be honest they are rude when approached about this. It got so bad at one point that we had a rat problem and raw sewerage in the garden of one of the properties which ran out onto the street. We approached the students and asked them to inform their landlord but nothing was done. It took having environmental health from the council out to get something done. So you have to see it from both points - yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them! Sadly because of situations like this then people do generalise which I admit is wrong. juwhite
  • Score: -13

7:07pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Rainbow over Helston says...

molesworth wrote:
Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants.
Do you not let your property to students in case they dont behave or trash the place? I am a mother of a student that did go to Falmouth uni but we both lived in Helston while she attended uni.
[quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants.[/p][/quote]Do you not let your property to students in case they dont behave or trash the place? I am a mother of a student that did go to Falmouth uni but we both lived in Helston while she attended uni. Rainbow over Helston
  • Score: 5

8:14pm Mon 10 Mar 14

molesworth says...

Rainbow over Helston wrote:
molesworth wrote:
Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants.
Do you not let your property to students in case they dont behave or trash the place? I am a mother of a student that did go to Falmouth uni but we both lived in Helston while she attended uni.
The property I rent out is upcountry. I have considered selling to buy a property in Falmouth and renting to students but I worry what would happen to my elderly tenants because they love living there. And I hardly make any money from it so I'm probably not cut out to be a landlord!
[quote][p][bold]Rainbow over Helston[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]molesworth[/bold] wrote: Like it or not, students are largely very middle class non violent and polite. Landlords are the 'villains' because they are just interested in money with no consideration for their tenants or the state of their properties. If the lunatic fringe want to have a go at a minority group then they should be spitting their vitriol at landlords. And I speak as a landlord who cares for my (non student) tenants.[/p][/quote]Do you not let your property to students in case they dont behave or trash the place? I am a mother of a student that did go to Falmouth uni but we both lived in Helston while she attended uni.[/p][/quote]The property I rent out is upcountry. I have considered selling to buy a property in Falmouth and renting to students but I worry what would happen to my elderly tenants because they love living there. And I hardly make any money from it so I'm probably not cut out to be a landlord! molesworth
  • Score: -1

8:51pm Mon 10 Mar 14

falmouthresident says...

esswords wrote:
"what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be?
It won't be for a couple of months
[quote][p][bold]esswords[/bold] wrote: "what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be?[/p][/quote]It won't be for a couple of months falmouthresident
  • Score: 0

8:55pm Mon 10 Mar 14

falmouthresident says...

juwhite wrote:
Unfortunately it is the bad ones we always hear about and I have to say Hopkins93 you are in a minority. I live in a road with some 4 houses rented to students with 5 or 6 students in each the majority who have cars hence about 20 cars whereas if it were a family we would probably have 8 cars so there is a big difference. We suffer noise from parties, rubbish and general untidiness from them and to be honest they are rude when approached about this. It got so bad at one point that we had a rat problem and raw sewerage in the garden of one of the properties which ran out onto the street. We approached the students and asked them to inform their landlord but nothing was done. It took having environmental health from the council out to get something done. So you have to see it from both points - yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them! Sadly because of situations like this then people do generalise which I admit is wrong.
You have completely missed the point, to use Hopkins93's words: "If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything."

When you say "yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them!" it makes no sense, you don't know the students coming, why would you not welcome them, surely moving into a hostile environment is going to cause more problems for everyone involved than if you let bygones by bygones.
[quote][p][bold]juwhite[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately it is the bad ones we always hear about and I have to say Hopkins93 you are in a minority. I live in a road with some 4 houses rented to students with 5 or 6 students in each the majority who have cars hence about 20 cars whereas if it were a family we would probably have 8 cars so there is a big difference. We suffer noise from parties, rubbish and general untidiness from them and to be honest they are rude when approached about this. It got so bad at one point that we had a rat problem and raw sewerage in the garden of one of the properties which ran out onto the street. We approached the students and asked them to inform their landlord but nothing was done. It took having environmental health from the council out to get something done. So you have to see it from both points - yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them! Sadly because of situations like this then people do generalise which I admit is wrong.[/p][/quote]You have completely missed the point, to use Hopkins93's words: "If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything." When you say "yes students are here to stay but unless they are all like you pardon me if I don't welcome them!" it makes no sense, you don't know the students coming, why would you not welcome them, surely moving into a hostile environment is going to cause more problems for everyone involved than if you let bygones by bygones. falmouthresident
  • Score: 4

9:02pm Mon 10 Mar 14

ucsweb says...

Well said hopkins93. Unfortunately "students" in Falmouth and Penryn has come to mean "those idiot self serving councilors and politicians who thought that dumping a few thousand people in an area without any plan or provision, care or consideration, without support or infrastructure would be a good idea and put a feather in their caps while playing the big I am".
I think Article 4 will be too little, too late and will be implemented (or not) by those same idiots. To understand what the area needed to do before the Uni was built, have a read of what Exeter council planned and implemented. An immense piece of work with the full understanding of what it takes to help the original community integrate with a new student community. Including the protection and support of both. This is something that could not be done on a small budget.
I feel we have all been let down by the people that should be supporting us (councilors, councils and politicians).
I live in a road of 24 houses, 7 of which are student lets with absentee landlords. They all include living rooms, lofts and even sheds that have been converted to bedrooms. At full capacity that is 37 people and none of them covered by Article 4!
It is time the councilors, councils and politicians do what we pay them for and get ORGANISED to support the community (residents- short and long term) against the problems that they have created.
Well said hopkins93. Unfortunately "students" in Falmouth and Penryn has come to mean "those idiot self serving councilors and politicians who thought that dumping a few thousand people in an area without any plan or provision, care or consideration, without support or infrastructure would be a good idea and put a feather in their caps while playing the big I am". I think Article 4 will be too little, too late and will be implemented (or not) by those same idiots. To understand what the area needed to do before the Uni was built, have a read of what Exeter council planned and implemented. An immense piece of work with the full understanding of what it takes to help the original community integrate with a new student community. Including the protection and support of both. This is something that could not be done on a small budget. I feel we have all been let down by the people that should be supporting us (councilors, councils and politicians). I live in a road of 24 houses, 7 of which are student lets with absentee landlords. They all include living rooms, lofts and even sheds that have been converted to bedrooms. At full capacity that is 37 people and none of them covered by Article 4! It is time the councilors, councils and politicians do what we pay them for and get ORGANISED to support the community (residents- short and long term) against the problems that they have created. ucsweb
  • Score: -2

8:53am Tue 11 Mar 14

juwhite says...

The point I was making is I can only judge on my experiences which are bad unfortunately. I don't think the university helps itself as it is only interested in the students which equals money. The art school was small but now it is part of the university it has grown too big and is taking over. No one asked if we wanted it and think to be honest it is in the wrong area. It would have been better to have built an all purpose site with accommodation where the heartlands site is which have eased the problems.
The point I was making is I can only judge on my experiences which are bad unfortunately. I don't think the university helps itself as it is only interested in the students which equals money. The art school was small but now it is part of the university it has grown too big and is taking over. No one asked if we wanted it and think to be honest it is in the wrong area. It would have been better to have built an all purpose site with accommodation where the heartlands site is which have eased the problems. juwhite
  • Score: 0

1:55pm Tue 11 Mar 14

esswords says...

falmouthresident wrote:
esswords wrote:
"what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be?
It won't be for a couple of months
Thanks.
[quote][p][bold]falmouthresident[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]esswords[/bold] wrote: "what parts of Falmouth will be covered by the legislation". Anyone know when this will be?[/p][/quote]It won't be for a couple of months[/p][/quote]Thanks. esswords
  • Score: 3

2:40pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Pendennisracer says...

hopkins93 wrote:
Pendennisracer wrote:
The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant.

Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth.

It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged.

I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area.

Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things.

No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return.

Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.
Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are.

I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me.

However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true.

Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time.

Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse.

I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting.

I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such.
I am only commenting based on my direct experience as to how properties around me have become and having mine & several cars damaged when staying in Mabe - we did chase and catch the persons involved who were students at Tremough but they escaped while we had to wait for the police to come from Helston - their alcohol fuelled adrenalin able to out run my dressing gown & bare feet.

I would love to welcome neighbours like you as only last week I had to clear up rubbish bins & hear talking loud discussions until late at night on the first dry evening of the year.

Rude or direct to the point, only saying as I find it, including directly quoting the hick town bit.
[quote][p][bold]hopkins93[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pendennisracer[/bold] wrote: The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant. Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth. It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged. I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area. Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things. No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return. Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.[/p][/quote]Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are. I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me. However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true. Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time. Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse. I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting. I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such.[/p][/quote]I am only commenting based on my direct experience as to how properties around me have become and having mine & several cars damaged when staying in Mabe - we did chase and catch the persons involved who were students at Tremough but they escaped while we had to wait for the police to come from Helston - their alcohol fuelled adrenalin able to out run my dressing gown & bare feet. I would love to welcome neighbours like you as only last week I had to clear up rubbish bins & hear talking loud discussions until late at night on the first dry evening of the year. Rude or direct to the point, only saying as I find it, including directly quoting the hick town bit. Pendennisracer
  • Score: 2

2:54pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Pendennisracer says...

juwhite wrote:
The point I was making is I can only judge on my experiences which are bad unfortunately. I don't think the university helps itself as it is only interested in the students which equals money. The art school was small but now it is part of the university it has grown too big and is taking over. No one asked if we wanted it and think to be honest it is in the wrong area. It would have been better to have built an all purpose site with accommodation where the heartlands site is which have eased the problems.
Exactly the same thoughts as mine, Heartlands area would have been far more apprpriate, in the main rail line & A30 too.

No one is denying there's good students in the town, but having seen several turn arounds of term years, we have seen many more who I'm afraid fit the descriptions we have made.

You are overlooking, we have grown up in the town and have seen the radical change. I remember classmates who lived in Marlborough Road - it was considered a more upmarket area where friends had professional parents, compare it to now.
[quote][p][bold]juwhite[/bold] wrote: The point I was making is I can only judge on my experiences which are bad unfortunately. I don't think the university helps itself as it is only interested in the students which equals money. The art school was small but now it is part of the university it has grown too big and is taking over. No one asked if we wanted it and think to be honest it is in the wrong area. It would have been better to have built an all purpose site with accommodation where the heartlands site is which have eased the problems.[/p][/quote]Exactly the same thoughts as mine, Heartlands area would have been far more apprpriate, in the main rail line & A30 too. No one is denying there's good students in the town, but having seen several turn arounds of term years, we have seen many more who I'm afraid fit the descriptions we have made. You are overlooking, we have grown up in the town and have seen the radical change. I remember classmates who lived in Marlborough Road - it was considered a more upmarket area where friends had professional parents, compare it to now. Pendennisracer
  • Score: -1

3:23pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Gillian R.Z. Martin says...

Pendennisracer wrote:
hopkins93 wrote:
Pendennisracer wrote:
The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant.

Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth.

It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged.

I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area.

Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things.

No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return.

Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.
Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are.

I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me.

However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true.

Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time.

Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse.

I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting.

I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such.
I am only commenting based on my direct experience as to how properties around me have become and having mine & several cars damaged when staying in Mabe - we did chase and catch the persons involved who were students at Tremough but they escaped while we had to wait for the police to come from Helston - their alcohol fuelled adrenalin able to out run my dressing gown & bare feet.

I would love to welcome neighbours like you as only last week I had to clear up rubbish bins & hear talking loud discussions until late at night on the first dry evening of the year.

Rude or direct to the point, only saying as I find it, including directly quoting the hick town bit.
I think it is good that you pursued the culprits. Seems a strange distribution of police officer availability, you had to wait for police from Helston, when I called the police out in the early hours one morning, I had to wait for police from Falmouth!

I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!
[quote][p][bold]Pendennisracer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hopkins93[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pendennisracer[/bold] wrote: The 'not knowing anybody' comment is a little daft really and not relevant. Gillian and others comments in the past, it's obvious you are not living with the student menace in Falmouth. It's a little frustrating that you are working hard & busting a gut to own a property in the town you grew up in. Especially when neighbouring houses are converted by student lets by landlords who live many miles away. When you try & keep your home smart, tidy, decorated & comfy and around you old blankets/newspapers are up and hanging out of windows, bins out on wrong days uncovered - you can imagine the mess with recent wind etc. If your home get graffitied (?)/damaged you clean it off/fix it, not leave it. Old cars used to transport stuff down at the start of the term get left with flat tyres etc until the tax runs out. Whilst your own car gets keyed and others more damaged. I'm sorry but with all of this, ghetto does seem a very appropriate term - just have a good look at Marlborough Road and the terraces/lanes around the area. Try walking here at times, students approaching 3 or 4 abreast and it us who are courteous stepping into the road. It's the same waiting for a seat in a pub or drink at the bar - we feel like second class citizens in our own town. I've heard of several students referring to living in this 'hick' town (their term not mine) before going onto better things. No wonder the resentment is there. We didn't ask for the monster at Tremough, yet we have to put up with the noise, the mess, the rudeness, the above average tax increases, the lack of community development in the town and generally nothing in return. Historically with the marine students, who were great, many stayed and furthered their career here as they liked the area for what it was, not just a backwards area for them to get the partying and care free attitude out of their system.[/p][/quote]Whilst I don't claim to speak for students as a whole, I just wanted to respond to this post and how upsetting, thoughtless and quite frankly rude many of its points are. I don't wish to say that students are perfect, and actually I believe that when someone displays antisocial behaviour they are not above criticism. But what I find difficult about many of the statements that you make is that you stereotype all students under one banner when that simply isn't the case. If an individual is guilty of anti-social behaviour then the blame lies with them - attaching a stigma to someone doesn't help anything. I would never accrue someone's antisocial behaviour to any form of stereotype and I wouldn't want someone to do it to me. However, as a 'student' having studied at the university for the past three years, you have stereotyped me, pigeonholed me and consequently accused me of things that simply aren't true. Firstly: I keep my house tidy. On several occasions both Townsend and my landlord have thanked myself and my housemates for looking after the house as well as we have. After living there for two years it is now in a better condition than when we moved in. We put our bins out (covered) at the correct time. Yes, I currently have my car down here, and I look after that too. It is taxed (I didn't quite understand that criticism as I haven't met anyone with either flat tyres or no tax disc). Whilst you may criticise me for taking up valuable parking spaces that should be available to residents, I add that I always aim to park considerately. The argument that student's cars take up too much room is also undermined by the fact that whether or not you are a long term resident, a car will take up space. Actually I have several neighbours who are local residents and own 2 to 3 cars and park them on a small, terraced road. I don't blame them for it because it's nobodies fault, its just an inevitable outcome of the increasing amount of carowners in an originally small town. Neither will I apologise for having my car in Falmouth. As I'm originally from the Midlands it has proved incredibly helpful in giving me the independence to travel home when my parents may not be able to come so far and the trains are both more expensive and often unfeasible because of the amount of luggage. I'd also like to add that I've recently had my car keyed, it was horrible and upsetting but it didn't mean that I automatically looked for a scapegoat of 'student' or 'local' to accuse. I am genuinely sorry if you feel like a second class citizen in your own town. But I would never call Falmouth a 'hick' town. It has been my home for the past three years and I feel incredibly privileged to have studied for my degree here. This is not a backwards area and it certainly isn't just some place that I've come to 'get the partying and care free attitude' out of my system. I came here to further my education, to learn to live independently and to have the opportunity to do that in quite a unique and beautiful setting. I know that there are problems between the student communication and the local populace. I actually agree with Article 4 and think that it is a good thing for the town. But what I do not agree with is being automatically accused for things that I have not done. I am an individual before I am a student and I would appreciate being treated as such.[/p][/quote]I am only commenting based on my direct experience as to how properties around me have become and having mine & several cars damaged when staying in Mabe - we did chase and catch the persons involved who were students at Tremough but they escaped while we had to wait for the police to come from Helston - their alcohol fuelled adrenalin able to out run my dressing gown & bare feet. I would love to welcome neighbours like you as only last week I had to clear up rubbish bins & hear talking loud discussions until late at night on the first dry evening of the year. Rude or direct to the point, only saying as I find it, including directly quoting the hick town bit.[/p][/quote]I think it is good that you pursued the culprits. Seems a strange distribution of police officer availability, you had to wait for police from Helston, when I called the police out in the early hours one morning, I had to wait for police from Falmouth! I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there! Gillian R.Z. Martin
  • Score: 4

3:49pm Tue 11 Mar 14

ucsweb says...

"I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!"
Says it all!
"I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!" Says it all! ucsweb
  • Score: 3

1:53pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Pendennisracer says...

ucsweb wrote:
"I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!"
Says it all!
very good ucsweb.

Gill, I was told, anything the other side of Asda was covered by Helston - including Mabe.

Ironically this article 4 ruling is going to shaft people like myself who have stayed, when we want to move, we must sell to a family/single occupancy - how many of this type of buyer will want to move into an area now predominently occupied by students.

Again, a good idea but too late.
[quote][p][bold]ucsweb[/bold] wrote: "I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!" Says it all![/p][/quote]very good ucsweb. Gill, I was told, anything the other side of Asda was covered by Helston - including Mabe. Ironically this article 4 ruling is going to shaft people like myself who have stayed, when we want to move, we must sell to a family/single occupancy - how many of this type of buyer will want to move into an area now predominently occupied by students. Again, a good idea but too late. Pendennisracer
  • Score: 2

2:02pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Gillian R.Z. Martin says...

ucsweb wrote:
"I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!"
Says it all!
I think the Cornwall Councillors are moving out of Truro and going Bodmin!
[quote][p][bold]ucsweb[/bold] wrote: "I am surprised they did not put the university in Truro, it appears everything else that is considered beneficial goes there!" Says it all![/p][/quote]I think the Cornwall Councillors are moving out of Truro and going Bodmin! Gillian R.Z. Martin
  • Score: 1

2:13pm Sun 16 Mar 14

FalmouthStudent says...

So, let me get this straight. You're going to 'deal with the problem' of we students, the menaces of your town, by limiting the number of people per house? Forgive me if I'm wrong, but something tells me that this is only going to serve to spread us over a wider area and start fringing on areas that would never have been viable for students in the first place...

I also vehemently disagree with all of the negative comments about students on here. I, as a normal human being, not just a student, take it upon myself to be as polite and helpful to anyone anywhere, even more so when I'm a guest in their town. I've lived in a Falmouth rented property for a year now with 4 other students and while yes, we do have the odd party and stumble home worse for wear, we've not once had anyone complaining to us, the landlord or the estate agents.

In all honesty, if you want to get a true image of the menaces of our town, take a walk down Falmouth highstreet on a Saturday (locals) night around 2am, when the punters are kicked out of Club I. I'd just like to point out the hugely increased police presence on Saturdays compared to the student Thursday nights, and how less likely you are to get into a fight for looking at someone the wrong way.
So, let me get this straight. You're going to 'deal with the problem' of we students, the menaces of your town, by limiting the number of people per house? Forgive me if I'm wrong, but something tells me that this is only going to serve to spread us over a wider area and start fringing on areas that would never have been viable for students in the first place... I also vehemently disagree with all of the negative comments about students on here. I, as a normal human being, not just a student, take it upon myself to be as polite and helpful to anyone anywhere, even more so when I'm a guest in their town. I've lived in a Falmouth rented property for a year now with 4 other students and while yes, we do have the odd party and stumble home worse for wear, we've not once had anyone complaining to us, the landlord or the estate agents. In all honesty, if you want to get a true image of the menaces of our town, take a walk down Falmouth highstreet on a Saturday (locals) night around 2am, when the punters are kicked out of Club I. I'd just like to point out the hugely increased police presence on Saturdays compared to the student Thursday nights, and how less likely you are to get into a fight for looking at someone the wrong way. FalmouthStudent
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree