Is this the end of mobile phone blackspots in Cornwall

Is this the end of mobile phone blackspots in Cornwall

Is this the end of mobile phone blackspots in Cornwall

First published in News

Mobile phone blackspots in rural parts of Cornwall that leave people with calls being cut off mid-conversation could become a thing of the past under plans reportedly being discussed by ministers.

Negotiations are taking place with mobile phone operators about asking them to help increase coverage by sharing phone masts, which would allow for the introduction of national roaming in the UK.

National roaming sees phones switching from one operator to another when service is not available through a particular provider, which is what happens when people travel abroad.

It would address the problem of partial "not-spots", areas where only some of the major networks are available.

The move would be good news for hundreds of thousands of people but could provoke resistance from mobile phone companies over sharing mobile phone masts with rivals.

A spokesman for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport said: "The Government has made clear it wants to ensure the UK has world-class mobile phone coverage as part of our investment in infrastructure for the long term economic plan.

"We are investing up to £150 million to improve mobile coverage in areas where there is currently no coverage from any of the Mobile Network Operators (MNOs).

"Of course we want to look at what more can be done in areas with poor coverage."

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

2:06pm Mon 23 Jun 14

Gill Z Martin says...

How does sharing the network from another service provider help, if none of the service providers supply a strong signal in a particular area?
I receive a Vodafone signal in Mullion, but only two or three signal bars on GPRS or Edge, which is slow and unsatisfactory for Internet use and not reliable during phone calls. In the 21st century I would have thought it not too difficult to provide everyone with 3G at least, given the profits mobile phone companies make.

The government stated a long time ago they were going to address the issue of phone signal coverage in rural areas and nothing was done, excuse my cynicism but now we approach the elections, the subject is brought to the forefront again.
How does sharing the network from another service provider help, if none of the service providers supply a strong signal in a particular area? I receive a Vodafone signal in Mullion, but only two or three signal bars on GPRS or Edge, which is slow and unsatisfactory for Internet use and not reliable during phone calls. In the 21st century I would have thought it not too difficult to provide everyone with 3G at least, given the profits mobile phone companies make. The government stated a long time ago they were going to address the issue of phone signal coverage in rural areas and nothing was done, excuse my cynicism but now we approach the elections, the subject is brought to the forefront again. Gill Z Martin
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree