Premier 'binned': Hotel refused, what you said

The refusal of controversial plans to build a Premier Inn hotel in Falmouth town centre by Cornwall Council's strategic planning committee have split opinion.

Members voted by nine votes to six to refuse permission for the scheme, which would have seen the 74 bedroom building built on the site of the Campbeltown Way car park near Events Square.

The application was refused on the grounds that, due to the size, scale and massing of the building, its unacceptable impact on the occupiers of neighbouring Fisher Court would outweigh any benefits the scheme would bring to the town.

The new hotel would have been built within a few metres of Fisher Court if it was granted permission.

The refusal has been welcomed by Rosemary Riddette Gregory, secretary of the Falmouth and District Hoteliers Association.

An “absolutely delighted” Mrs Riddette Gregory said they had firm convictions that it was not the right plan for Falmouth, especially with inadequate parking.

She added that while she hopes the town has seen the end of the plan, she had a suspicion that it would go to appeal.

“It was very gratifying that a large number of the public were thinking along the same lines.

“This was not just about the hotel owners, there was a lot of support from guests who visit the town.

What you said:

Jane-w said: “I'm devastated. The benefits this would bring to the town in terms of income have ignored due to nimbys. I personally hate and detest the village of Port Pendennis and this is an overdevelopment which is only used by people who have moved down here to retire - what about us who need jobs which this would have provided. A sad loss for Falmouth I fear.”

Another reader added: “This is an error by CC who will never have the vision to develop, just bury your heads in the sand and let other towns and cities flourish whilst Falmouth stands still or goes backwards. Falmouth is not welcoming to tourists, it has a small minded attitude. And as for the hoteliers, B/B owners, get in the real world and improve your lot, it is called competition, it is fair and it is how the real world progresses.


Cornish Blonde said: “I speak for many in Falmouth who are very pleased at the decision. Falmouth is unique and we do not need this generic hotel, boring, off-the-shelf architecture, and profits going out of county. If they had applied to build something of quality, suitable to the size of the plot, that provided a wonderful new experience to the discerning (and wealthy) visitor, I would have supported it. Always assuming they provided the right amount of parking too.”


Fal Mick said: “The application was not turned down on the grounds of competition, that is not a reason to oppose. It was turned down because of the 'impact' on the nearest dwellings. This application will succeed on appeal, or they will resubmit with the removal of the top floor, seven rooms, so get used to the idea that this time next year we will have a Premier inn and the hoteliers and B&B owners should up their game to compete.”
Rosie said: “Thank goodness, common sense has prevailed. Falmouth must not become like any other town. Premier Inn belongs on the outskirts, not in the town centre. the historic feel of Falmouth is so special and so important to try and hold on to.”

Comments (2)

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12:54pm Wed 19 Dec 12

Teejay says...

Ironic the refusal was for spoiling the view from Port Pendennis.
Pity they didn't have the same principles in 1984-5 when Port Pendennis took the same view away from Bar Road and Arwenack Manor.
Does this also mean no hope for building something on the old Dock & Railway / Admiral Nelson site in case it spoils their views?
Ironic the refusal was for spoiling the view from Port Pendennis. Pity they didn't have the same principles in 1984-5 when Port Pendennis took the same view away from Bar Road and Arwenack Manor. Does this also mean no hope for building something on the old Dock & Railway / Admiral Nelson site in case it spoils their views? Teejay
  • Score: 0

1:06pm Wed 19 Dec 12

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

I was always led to believe that one is not entitled to a view. Certain private dwellings have in the past been built directly in front of existing properties, blocking or partially blocking their sea views and devaluing their properties.
I was always led to believe that one is not entitled to a view. Certain private dwellings have in the past been built directly in front of existing properties, blocking or partially blocking their sea views and devaluing their properties. Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

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