Road safety call to cut back hedges

First published in Truro
Last updated

Now is the time to check whether your hedges and trees need pruning, particularly by the roadside, and to carry out any required work, say highways experts Cormac.

Maintenance is needed to ensure that the county’s roads are safe for motorists, cyclists, horse riders and pedestrians. This includes vegetation along pavements and public rights of way.

With over 4,500 miles of road in Cornwall, many bordered by hedges, bushes and trees, boundary hedges on private land are the responsibility of the landowner or occupier. 

Overgrown hedges growing over pavements can force pedestrians out into the road, putting them at risk from passing traffic.

They can also cause problems for delivery vehicles serving farms - the loss of a wing mirror can result in a repair cost of £500 and a side sheet, if torn, can cost in the region of £2,000 to replace.

 The vehicle owner can try and reclaim these costs from the owner of the property concerned.

The Cornwall Highways leaflet Cornish Roadside Hedge Management offers advice to landowners on how and when to cut hedges to ensure road safety is not compromised and to encourage biodiversity.

The leaflet was produced with input from ‘The Cornish Hedge Group’ - 18 voluntary and statutory organisations concerned with farming, conservation and public interests in Cornwall.

More information can be found at www.cornwall.gov.uk – type ‘Cornish Roadside Hedge Management into the search engine.

Comments (2)

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11:57am Thu 14 Feb 13

Gill Zella Martin 09 says...

Cornwall Council highways department, now is the time to start filling those potholes, particularly on bus routes and school bus routes, so that vehicles have some sort of adhesion to the road surface. The danger to motorcyclists and cyclists is particularly enhanced by the presence of potholes, and the damage to car suspensions can be a costly business.
You have in place lots of pretty red signs saying temporary road surface, presumably as a legal get out clause, however, the question remains, how long is 'temporary' ?
Cornwall Council highways department, now is the time to start filling those potholes, particularly on bus routes and school bus routes, so that vehicles have some sort of adhesion to the road surface. The danger to motorcyclists and cyclists is particularly enhanced by the presence of potholes, and the damage to car suspensions can be a costly business. You have in place lots of pretty red signs saying temporary road surface, presumably as a legal get out clause, however, the question remains, how long is 'temporary' ? Gill Zella Martin 09
  • Score: 0

12:42pm Thu 14 Feb 13

Wave says...

A landowner, I presume can also claim against any driver who damages their brambles or stones in their hedge.
It works both ways.
A landowner, I presume can also claim against any driver who damages their brambles or stones in their hedge. It works both ways. Wave
  • Score: 0

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